Saturday, May 1, 2021

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton, an officer highly regarded by Trumbull and Washington




Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton
( November 22, 1740 - September 16, 1776 )

an officer highly regarded by Trumbull and Washington


"I do not value my life if we do but gain the day."
- Col. Thomas Knowlton at the Battle of Harlem Heights, September 16, 1776.[1]



General Israel Putnam Branch #4
The Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution

225th Anniversary Remembrance Ceremonies for Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton
Killed at the Battle of Harlem Heights (September 16, 1776)

Snow Cemetery, Ashford, Connecticut, September 16, 2001




Thomas Knowlton is mentioned in Stuart's "Life of Jonathan Trumbull," In a letter from Gov. Jonathan Trumbull, to his son, Col. Joseph Trumbull, Commissary-General of the Continental Army on September 21, 1776, regarding, "The evacuation of the City and Island of New-York."[2] Gov. Trumbull writes that New York City, "is then left an asylum and resting place for our enemies. --Strange that those who fight pro aris et focis, should behave in such a poltroon manner, as you mention some of them did on Sunday. It seems some others made up for it on Monday. I lament the loss of the brave Lt. Col. Knowlton--would others behave with the spirit and bravery he did, our affairs would soon put on a different aspect."[3]

In a letter from General George Washington to Governor Jonathan Trumbull dated, "Head Quarters Heights of Harlem Sepr 23d 1776,"[4] Washington states, "Our loss in number was very inconsiderable, but must be considered as great, in the fall of Lieut. Colo. Knowlton of your State who commanded a party of Rangers composed of Volunteers from the several New-England Regiments, and who was a brave and good Officer - Every honor was paid to his merit in his interment that the situation of things would admit of."[5]

Regarding the Knowlton statue sculpted by Enoch S. Woods, "The object has been to present within the allowable limits of art an historic figure, representative of the time and of the soldier who died in action. The only authority for the likeness is in Trumbull's portrait of Knowlton in his famous picture of the battle of Bunker Hill. In the judgement of the Commission the statue is worthy of the hero and of the conspicuous position it occupies."[6]




"You see, my son, I am mortally wounded, 
you can do me no good, go fight for your country."
- Col. Thomas Knowlton to his son, Frederick Knowlton, at the Battle of Harlem Heights 
September 16, 1776.[7]


Statue of Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton
State Capitol, Hartford, Connecticut


"our greatest loss was a brave officer from Connecticut, whose name and spirit ought to
be immortalized, one Colonel Knowlton. I assisted him off, and when gasping in the agonies 
of death all his inquiry was if we had drove the enemy."
- Col. Joseph Reed, September 17, 1776.[8]


"The gallant and brave Col. Knowlton, who would have been an honor to any country, 
having fallen yesterday while gloriously fighting."
- General George Washington, General Orders, September 17, 1776.[9]


"I lament the loss of the brave Lt. Col. Knowlton--would others behave with the spirit and bravery he did, our affairs would soon put on a different aspect."
- Gov. Jonathan Trumbull, September 21, 1776.[10]



Memorial to Lt. Col. Thomas Knowlton and his wife Anna Keyes
Snow Cemetery, Ashford, Connecticut




The following is an updated version of The Scarlet Standard Historical Series, No. 3, 1997, Lt. Col. Thomas Knowlton, Connecticut's Forgotten Hero.[11]


Lt. Col. Thomas Knowlton, Connecticut's Forgotten Hero 


Knowlton before the Revolution, 1740-1775

Thomas Knowlton was born about November 22, 1740 in West Boxford, Massachusetts.[12] When Knowlton was eight years old his father moved the family to Ashford, Connecticut, where they lived on a farm of 400 acres. In 1755 the War with France started (French & Indian War). In 1757 Knowlton first appears as a Private on the muster rolls of Captain John Slapp's 8th Company, Col. Phineas Lyman's First Connecticut Regiment.[13] In Captain Jedediah Fay's 10th Company, Col. Eleazer Fitch's Third Connecticut Regiment along with his brother Daniel from May 1, 1758 to November 20, 1758.[14] In 1759 he's listed as a Sergeant in Major John Slapp's 3rd Company, First Connecticut Regiment.[15] 1760 listed as an Ensign in Major John Slapp's 3rd Company, Maj.-Gen. Phineas Lyman's First Connecticut Regiment.[16] Listed as an Ensign in Captain Robert Durkee's 10th Company, Maj.-Gen. Phineas Lyman's First Connecticut Regiment from April 1, 1761 to December 3, 1761,[17] and listed as a Second Lieutenant in Captain Hugh Ledlie's 10th Company, Col. Phineas Lyman's First Connecticut Regiment from March 15, 1762 to December 10, 1762.[18]

It should be noted to avoid confusion, that there was another Thomas Knowlton, of East Haddam, Connecticut who also served in the French & Indian Wars.[19]

In 1762 Thomas Knowlton participated in the Battle of Havana, Cuba, and was lucky enough to survive and return to Ashford.[20] (Of Israel Putnam's Company of 107 men, only 20 returned home, due mostly to tropical diseases.) On April 5, 1759 Thomas Knowlton married Anna Keyes of Ashford and bought a farm on the present site of the June Norcross Webster Scout Reservation.[21] Knowlton and his wife raised a family of nine children, Frederick his sixteen-year-old son would accompany his father to fight in the American Revolution. Knowlton at the age of 33 was appointed as one of the Selectmen of the town.

I have not been able to find anything (if there is any?) regarding Thomas Knowlton's activity with the Susquehanna Company, Company of Military Adventurers, or the Connecticut Sons of Liberty in 1765 in opposition to the Stamp Act and Connecticut's Stamp Master, Jared Ingersoll. One could assume that he at least played some roll in the Connecticut Sons of Liberty? Knowlton did know, and serve under the principle leaders Israel Putnam, Hugh Ledlie, and John Durkee, before and during the American Revolution.

Knowlton and the American Revolution, 1775-1776

When news of the skirmishes at Lexington and Concord reached Ashford, Thomas Knowlton grabbed his musket and joined his militia company. The Ashford company was part of the Fifth Regiment of Connecticut Militia, along with the town militia companies of Windham, Mansfield, and Coventry (Connecticut organized all its town militia companies into regiments in 1739.). At the time, the Ashford company had no Captain, so the company drew ballots and Thomas Knowlton was unanimously chosen. The Ashford militia company was the "first to enter Massachusetts from a sister colony."[22] At Boston, they were reorganized into the fifth company of General Israel Putnam's Third Connecticut Regiment of 1775. Captain Thomas "Knowlton was the favorite officer of Putnam, and such confidence did the veteran general repose in the accuracy of his judgement, that he invariably consulted him in matters of importance."[23]



Stone tablet marking the site of President Langdon's prayer
Cambridge, Massachusetts [24]


The night prior to the Battle of Bunker Hill, June 16, 1775, Captain Thomas Knowlton was in command of a fatigue party of 200 Connecticut men constructing defenses. During the Battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775, he was in command of the Rail Fence which protected the rear of the patriot redoubt on Breed's Hill. When the patriots began their retreat from the redoubt, it was Captain Knowlton and his men who formed the rear guard covering their retreat.[25]



Rail Fence Marker, Bunker Hill Burying Ground, Charlestown, Massachusetts




For his bravery, Congress promoted Captain Thomas Knowlton to Major. A wealthy Boston man presented Knowlton with a gold-laced hat, sash, and a golden breastplate. Colonel Arron Burr later in life said of his friend Knowlton, "I had a full account of the Battle from Knowlton's own lips, and I believe if the chief command had been entrusted to him, the issue would have proved more fortunate." Burr also commented on Knowlton's promotion, "It was impossible to promote such a man too rapidly."[26]



Copy of a brass gorget similar in design to Col. Thomas Knowlton's 
"golden breastplate" illustrated in the New York Times, February 9, 1896.



In the February 9, 1896 edition of The New York Times, there is an article titled, "Col. Knowlton's Famous Gorget," and in that article there is an illustration of Col. Thomas Knowlton's gorget, owned by one of his descendants. "It was brought to Hartford a few weeks ago to be exhibited, with the two or three valuable relics of the Revolutionary hero, at the time of the dedication of the state memorial which was erected on the Capitol grounds here in honor of Knowlton's memory, . . ."[27]

In 1776, with the reorganization of the American army, Major Thomas Knowlton was assigned to the 20th Continental Regiment under the command of Colonel John Durkee.

On the evening of January 8, 1776, during the Siege of Boston, Knowlton was sent by General George Washington to burn the remaining buildings at the base of Bunker Hill, and to capture the British guard. Major Thomas Knowlton accomplished this mission without losing a man. "having burnt eight houses, and brought with them a sergeant and four privates, of the Tenth Regiment."[28]

Knowlton was a favorite of Washington, "in midsummer Washington made frequent use of Knowlton's unerring military judgement in investigating enemy positions and devising plans for attack."[29]

On June 29, 1776, Knowlton is one of the officers who signed "The most respectful Address of the Officers and Soldiers of the several Regiments in the Second Brigade, stationed in and near the City of New-York:," to General George Washington reaffirming their continued loyalty and support.[30] This address followed an attempted assassination plot against General George Washington, and the execution of Thomas Hickey, a soldier in General George Washington's guards, on June 28, 1776 in New York City for ,"mutiny and sedition, and also of holding a treacherous correspondence with the enemies of said Colonies, . . ."[31]

On July 12, 1776, at a Council of War, General George Washington proposed a plan to attack the enemy on Staten Island.[32] "The General then proposed a Partisan Party, with a view to alarm the enemy and encourage our own Troops, who seem generally desirous that something should be done. Agreed, that Major Knowlton, who is stationed at Bergen, and has reconnoitred the Island, do confer with General Mercer thereon; and if they, upon consideration, shall deem such a surprise practicable, and that the retreat of the men can be secured, the General be advised to prosecute it. That this enterprise be accompanied with a cannonade upon the fleet from Bergen-Point, if the distance will admit."[33] But, "Twice they made preparations for crossing the straits, but were prevented, once by tempestuous weather, and once by deficiency of boats."[34]

Head-Quarters, New York, August 12, 1776, Major Knowlton was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel.

"Lieutenant-Colonel [John] Durkee is appointed Colonel of the [20th Continental] Regiment late Arnold's, and Major [Thomas] Knowlton Lieutenant-Colonel of said Regiment."[35]

"After the American defeat on Long Island, Aug. 27, '76, a small body of select troops was organized for special service along the lines and placed under the command of Lieut.-Col. Thomas Knowlton of Durkee's Conn. Regt. 20th Continental."[36]

In September, Knowlton was put in command of an elite hand picked independent corps which was under the direct command of General George Washington. This unit was called the "Rangers," or "Knowlton's Rangers." Captain Nathan Hale (Connecticut's State Hero) was a member of this unit.

On September 16, 1776 Knowlton's Rangers were scouting in advance of the main army at Harlem Heights, New York, when they stumbled upon the Black Watch. A skirmish began which ended with Knowlton being mortally wounded.[37] Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton was carried off the field to prevent capture. He was reputed to say, "You see my son, I am mortally wounded; you can do me no good; go fight for your country."[38] Gen. Washington upon hearing the news stated, "The gallant and brave Col. Knowlton, who would have been an honor to any country, having fallen yesterday while gloriously fighting."[39] Knowlton was buried with military honors in an unmarked grave at 143rd Street and St. Nicholas Avenue. The Rev. Abiel Leonard, Chaplain of Col. Knox's Artillery Regiment and formerly of the 20th Continental Regiment, "officiated at the burial services September 17, 1776 of Col. Thomas Knowlton killed the day before at Harlem Heights, . ."[40] George Washington, in his letter to John Hancock, President of Congress, dated September 18, 1776, states, "Major Leitch I am in hopes will recover, But Colo. Knolton's fall is much to be regretted, as that of a brave & good officer."[41]

Knowlton is described as being, "six feet high, erect and elegant in figure, and formed more for activity than strength, courteous and affable in manners. . . the favorite of superior officers, the idol of his soldiers. . ."[42]



Battle of Harlem Heights Memorial, New York City, New York
"To Commemorate the Battle of Harlem Heights, won by Washington's Troops
on this site, September 16, 1776."
Erected by The Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York



After the death of Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Knowlton, the Rangers were assigned to Fort Washington. "At the surrender of the fort, November 16, 1776, they were captured with the rest of the garrison. Many of these brave men underwent dreadful sufferings, and several perished in British prison ships."[43]



Site of Fort Washington, New York City, New York


Highest point inside Fort Washington


Outline of the walls of Fort Washington




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A 200th Anniversary Remembrance Ceremony for Captain Nathan Hale (who held the rank of Captain in Knowlton's Rangers) was held at the Nathan Hale Monument in Coventry, Connecticut in 1976 during the American Bicentennial by the Nathan Hale Ancient Fifes and Drums and Knowlton's Rangers.[44]

But, "The anniversary of the death of Col. Knowlton passed virtually unnoticed except by a few of his present-day admirers."[45]


The General Israel Putnam Branch #4 CTSSAR and its living history/color guard unit, the Eleventh Regiment of Connecticut Militia (a detachment of the Connecticut Line CTSSAR) held annual Remembrance Ceremonies for Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton in Ashford, Connecticut from 1997 to 2002 (including the 225th Anniversary Remembrance Ceremony in 2001), and again in 2005 at the Rail Fence in Charlestown, Massachusetts and at the Knowlton Statue at the State Capitol in Hartford, Connecticut. Since 1997 members of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution have annually placed a wreath on Bunker Hill Day at the Connecticut Gate at the Bunker Hill Monument in remembrance of Captain Thomas Knowlton and the Connecticut men who fought at the Battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775.

During the Ashford ceremonies the Gen. Israel Putnam Branch #4 CTSSAR dedicated and placed over 40 Revolutionary War Patriot grave markers and flags at Revolutionary War Veteran's graves at cemeteries in the Ashford area. 

Plans are now being discussed for a possible 250th Anniversary Remembrance Ceremony for Lt. Col. Thomas Knowlton in 2026.




General Israel Putnam Branch #4
The Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution

221st Anniversary
Remembrance Ceremonies for Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton
Killed at the Battle of Harlem Heights (September 16, 1776)

Snow Cemetery, Ashford, Connecticut

September 21, 1997










~ -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ~

General Israel Putnam Branch #4
The Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution

222nd Anniversary
Remembrance Ceremonies for Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton
Killed at the Battle of Harlem Heights (September 16, 1776)

Snow Cemetery, Ashford, Connecticut

September 20, 1998








~ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ~

General Israel Putnam Branch #4
The Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution

223rd Anniversary
Remembrance Ceremonies for Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton
Killed at the Battle of Harlem Heights (September 16, 1776)

Snow Cemetery, Ashford, Connecticut

September 26, 1999




~ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ~

General Israel Putnam Branch #4
The Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution


225th Anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill
First Major Battle of the American Revolution (June 17, 1775)

Bunker Hill Monument, Boston National Park, Charlestown, Massachusetts

June 17, 2000

Members of the 11th Regiment Connecticut Militia, Living History/Color Guard Unit of the General Israel Putnam Branch #4 CTSSAR (a detachment of the Connecticut Line CTSSAR) took part in the 225th Anniversary Bunker Hill Day Ceremonies and the Battle of Bunker Hill Tactical Demonstration narrated by author/historian George C. Neumann at the Bunker Hill Monument in Charlestown, Massachusetts. Members also placed a wreath at the Connecticut Gate in honor of Captain Thomas Knowlton and the Connecticut Men who fought at the Battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775.  











224th Anniversary
Remembrance Ceremonies for Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton
Killed at the Battle of Harlem Heights (September 16, 1776)

Snow Cemetery, Ashford, Connecticut

September 16, 2000




~ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ~

General Israel Putnam Branch #4
The Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution

225th Anniversary
Remembrance Ceremonies for Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton
Killed at the Battle of Harlem Heights (September 16, 1776)

Snow Cemetery, Ashford, Connecticut

September 16, 2001









~ -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ~

General Israel Putnam Branch #4
The Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution

226th Anniversary
Remembrance Ceremonies for Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton
Killed at the Battle of Harlem Heights (September 16, 1776)

Snow Cemetery, Ashford, Connecticut

September 22, 2002





~ --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ~

General Israel Putnam Branch #4
The Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution

230th Anniversary
Commemoration Ceremonies for Captain Thomas Knowlton and the Connecticut men who fortified and fought at the Rail Fence during the Battle of Bunker Hill (June 17, 1775)

Site of the Rail Fence, Bunker Hill Burying Ground, Charlestown, Massachusetts

June 17, 2005









References

1) Statue of Colonel Thomas Knowlton Ceremonies at the Unveiling, Press of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, Hartford, Conn., 1895, page 37; The History and Genealogy of the Knowltons of England and America, Rev. Charles Henry Wright Stocking, D.D., The Knickerbocker Press, New York, 1897, page 92; Battle for Manhattan, Bruce Bliven, Jr., Henry Holt and Company, New York, 1956, page 96.
2) Life of Jonathan Trumbull, Sen., Governor of Connecticut, I. W. Stuart, Crocker and Brewster, Boston, 1859, note on page 275.
3) Ibid.
4) From George Washington to Jonathan Trumbull, Sr., 23 September 1776,” Founders Online, National Archives, accessed September 29, 2019, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/03-06-02-0296. [Original source: The Papers of George Washington, Revolutionary War Series, vol. 6, 13 August 1776 – 20 October 1776, ed. Philander D. Chase and Frank E. Grizzard, Jr. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1994, pp. 380–382.]
5) Ibid.
6) Statue of Colonel Thomas Knowlton Ceremonies at the Unveiling, Press of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, Hartford, Conn., 1895, page 6.
7) Col. Thomas Knowlton, Ashbel Woodward, M.D., New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XV, No. 1, January, 1861, New England Historic-Genealogical Society, Samuel G. Drake, Publisher, Boston, page 11.
8) Life and Correspondence of Joseph Reed, Military Secretary of Washington, at Cambridge; Adjutant-General of the Continental Army; Member of the Congress of the United States; and President of the Executive Council of the State of Pennsylvania, by his Grandson, William B. Reed, Vol.1, Lindsay and Blakiston, Philadelphia, 1847, pages 237-239; Statue of Colonel Thomas Knowlton Ceremonies at the Unveiling, Press of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, Hartford, Conn., 1895, pages 36-37.
9) Statue of Colonel Thomas Knowlton Ceremonies at the Unveiling, Press of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, Hartford, Conn., 1895, page 36.
10) Life of Jonathan Trumbull, Sen., Governor of Connecticut, I. W. Stuart, Crocker and Brewster, Boston, 1859, note on page 275.
11) The Scarlet Standard Historical Series, No. 3, 1997, Lt. Col. Thomas Knowlton, Connecticut's Forgotten Hero, Gen. Israel Putnam Branch #4 CTSSAR, <www.ConnecticutSAR.org>; Patriot Profile, Lt. Col. Thomas Knowlton, Connecticut's Forgotten Hero, Todd Gerlander and Lee Gerlander, Common Patriot, The American Revolutionary War Magazine, Issue IV, Volume I, 2006, page 22.
12) The History and Genealogy of the Knowltons of England and America, Rev. Charles Henry Wright Stocking, D.D., The Knickerbocker Press, New York, 1897, page 89.
13) Rolls of Connecticut Men in the French and Indian War, 1775-1762.,Volume I, 1755-1757, Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, 1905, page 183.
14) Rolls of Connecticut Men in the French and Indian War, 1775-1762.,Volume II, 1758-1762, Appendixes 1755-1764, Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, 1905, pages 66-67.
15) Ibid. page 105.
16) Ibid. pages 183-184.
17) Ibid. pages 251-252.
18) Ibid. page 315.
19) Rolls of Connecticut Men in the French and Indian War, 1775-1762.,Volume I, 1755-1757, Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, 1905, pages 202-203, 256.
20) Col. Thomas Knowlton, Ashbel Woodward, M.D., New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XV, No. 1, January, 1861, New England Historic-Genealogical Society, Samuel G. Drake, Publisher, Boston, page 3; The Death of Colonel Thomas Knowlton, Sheldon S. Cohen, The Connecticut Historical Society Bulletin, Volume 30, Number 2, April 1965, Published by the Connecticut Historical Society.
21) "In 1963, the Eastern Connecticut Council of the Boy Scouts of America set out to establish a new scout camp on the land once owned by Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Knowlton in the Town of Ashford, Connecticut.", June Norcross Webster Scout Reservation Website, https://www.gotowebster.org
22) Col. Thomas Knowlton, Ashbel Woodward, M.D., New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XV, No. 1, January, 1861, New England Historic-Genealogical Society, Samuel G. Drake, Publisher, Boston, page 7.
23)  Ibid. page 4.
24) The Cambridge Historical Society, Publications V, Proceedings January 25 - October 25, 1910, The University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1911, page 26.
25) The Connecticut Bicentennial Gazette, Volume IV, Number 6, June 1975, The American Revolution Bicentennial Commission of Connecticut, Hartford, page 4.
26) Col. Thomas Knowlton, Ashbel Woodward, M.D., New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XV, No. 1, January, 1861, New England Historic-Genealogical Society, Samuel G. Drake, Publisher, Boston, pages 7-8.
27) Col. Knowlton's Famous Gorget, The New York Times, February 9, 1896.
28) American Archives: Fourth Series. Containing a Documentary History of the English Colonies in North America, from the King's Message to Parliament, of March 7, 1774, to The Declaration of Independence by the United States, Peter Force, Volume IV, Washington, April, 1843, pages 629-630.
29) Founders and Leaders of Connecticut 1633-1783, edited by Charles Edward Perry, Department of History Hartford Public High School, D. C. Heath and Company, 1934, page 197.
30) American Archives: Fourth Series. Containing a Documentary History of the English Colonies in North America, from the King's Message to Parliament, of March 7, 1774, to The Declaration of Independence by the United States, Peter Force, Volume VI, Washington, March, 1846, pages 1119-1120.
31) Ibid. pages 1135-1136.
32) The Writings of George Washington; being his Correspondence, Addresses, Messages, and other Papers, Official and Private, Selected and Published from the Original Manuscripts; with a Life of the Author, Notes, and Illustrations, Volume IV, Jared Sparks, Ferdinand Andrews, Publisher, Boston, 1840, note on page 20.
33) American Archives: Fifth Series Containing a Documentary History of The United States of America from the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776, to the Definitive Treaty of Peace with Great Britain, September 3, 1783, Peter Force, Volume I, Washington, April, 1848, page 224.
34) Col. Thomas Knowlton, Ashbel Woodward, M.D., New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XV, No. 1, January, 1861, New England Historic-Genealogical Society, Samuel G. Drake, Publisher, Boston, page 9.
35) American Archives: Fifth Series Containing a Documentary History of The United States of America from the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776, to the Definitive Treaty of Peace with Great Britain, September 3, 1783, Peter Force, Volume I, Washington, April, 1848, pages 914-915.
36) Connecticut Men in the War of the Revolution, Adjutants-General, Hartford, 1889, page 121.
37) The Battle of Harlem Heights, Thomas Addis Emmet, The Magazine of History, with Notes and Queries, Vol. IV, No. 3, September 1906, William Abbatt, New York, page 132.
38) Col. Thomas Knowlton, Ashbel Woodward, M.D., New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XV, No. 1, January, 1861, New England Historic-Genealogical Society, Samuel G. Drake, Publisher, Boston, page 11.
39) General Orders, Head Quarters, Harlem Heights, September 17, 1776, George Washington Papers, Series 3, Varick Transcripts, 1775-1785, Subseries 3G, General Orders, 1775-1783, Letterbook 1: July 3, 1775 - Sept. 30, 1776, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress.
40) The History of Woodstock, Connecticut, Clarence Winthrop Bowen, PH.D., LL.D., The Plimpton Press, Norwood, Massachusetts, 1926, page 149.
41) From George Washington to John Hancock, 18 September 1776, Founders Online, National Archives, http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/03-06-02-0264. [Original source: The Papers of George Washington, Revolutionary War Series, Vol. 6, 13 August 1776 - 20 October 1776, ed. Philander D. Chase and Frank E. Grizzard, Jr. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1994, pp. 331-337.]
42) Alarums & Skirmishes, The Revolutionaries of Connecticut, Leonard Byrne, Limited to 50 printed, The Bulletin Company, Norwich, Connecticut, 1976, page 260.
43) Statue of Colonel Thomas Knowlton Ceremonies at the Unveiling, Press of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, Hartford, Conn., 1895, note on page 37.
44) Death Anniversaries of Two Connecticut Heroes Quietly Observed, The Connecticut Bicentennial Gazette, Volume V, Number 8, September-November, 1976, The American Revolution Bicentennial Commission of Connecticut, Hartford,  pages 3, 10.
45) Ibid. page 3.