Friday, December 2, 2016

Memorial to Faith Robinson Trumbull, wife of Governor Jonathan Trumbull, Sr.



Memorial to Faith Robinson Trumbull (1718-1780)




Memorial to Faith Robinson Trumbull, wife of Jonathan Trumbull, Sr., Revolutionary War Governor of Connecticut. Trumbull family tomb, Trumbull Cemetery, Lebanon, Connecticut. 





Saturday, November 26, 2016

Catherine (Johnson) Alvord of Colchester, Connecticut. Wife of Obed Alvord, Revolutionary War Veteran.




Catherine (Johnson) Alvord


Catherine Johnson, daughter of Elijah Johnson and Sarah Trumble, was born at Colchester, Connecticut, 1 August 1744[1] baptized at Colchester, Connecticut, 14 September 1746[2] she married at Colchester, Connecticut, 4 January 1767, OBED ALVORD[3], son of Asahel Alvord and Rachel Gould[4] born probably Colchester, Connecticut, 1 August 1744.[5] 

Obed Alvord was a Revolutionary War Veteran. "Rev. War Service: "Alvord, Obed. Private in Militia Horse, 1779; detached to serve in Continental Army to the 15th of Jan., 1780, from Capt. James Green's Co. of East Haddam; Elijah Hyde, Maj., Lebanon, Oct. 5, 1779." (Conn. Men in Rev.)"[6]  

Children of Obed and Catherine (Johnson) Alvord, all born in Colchester, Connecticut:[7]

1) Alexander Alvord, b. 6 Aug 1767.
2) Elijah Johnson Alvord, b. 12 Jun 1770.
3) Rachel Alvord, b. 19 Nov 1772.
4) Sarah Alvord, b. 23 May 1775.
5) Eunice Alvord, b. 15 Mar 1778.
6) Lucy Alvord, b. 15 May 1780.
7) Obed Alvord, b. 21 Sep 1782.
8) Elisha Alvord, b. 5 Apr 1785.
9) Lydia Alvord, b. 3 Jun 1788.
10) Semer (Seymour) Alvord, b. 7 Apr 1793; d. Colchester, Connecticut, 12 May 1793. 



1. William E. Johnson, John Johnson and Other Johnsons (McDonough, N.Y.: the Author, 1940), 54-55. 
2. Ibid.
3. A Genealogy of the Descendants of Alexander Alvord, an Early Settler of Windsor, Conn. and Northampton, Mass., compiled by Samuel Morgan Alvord, A.D. Andrews, Printer, Webster, N.Y., 1908, 102.
4. Ibid. 60.
5. Ibid. 60.
6. Ibid. 102.
7. Ibid. 102.


For more information on the ancestry of Catherine (Johnson) Alvord, see previous blog posts:

* The Lost Trumbull: The Descendants of Joseph Trumble, Jr. (1705-1731) of Lebanon, Connecticut.

* Sarah Trumble, The Wife of Elijah Johnson of Colchester, Connecticut.






Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Sketch of Captain Joseph Trumble, Sr. of Lebanon, Connecticut.




Pencil Sketch of Captain Joseph Trumble, Sr., Patriarch of the Trumble/Trumbull family of Lebanon, Connecticut (my ancestral grandfather), with the Trumbull family store in the background, later his son Jonathan's Revolutionary War Office. Joseph Trumble, Sr. moved to Lebanon, Connecticut in 1704, and according to tradition built this building in 1727.

"He was distinguished for high integrity and great enterprise as a merchant, active in all the local affairs of the church and the town, and for many years captain of the train-band. He was the father of Jonathan, the "war Governor," and was the founder of the Lebanon branch of the family."[1]

Joseph Trumble, Sr. was commissioned Lieutenant of the New London County Troop of Horse in 1718, and commissioned Captain of the Windham County Troop of Horse in 1728. 

He married Hannah Higley, the daughter of Captain John Higley and Hannah Drake.

"God's best gift to Lebanon was its first settlers. Captain Joseph Trumbull, the first of the name here, and the founder of the Lebanon branch of the family, settled here in 1704, just after the town was organized. He was a farmer and a merchant, and subsequently engaged, with his sons, in foreign commerce, building vessels of their own on the Thames and the Connecticut, and exchanging their exports for imports from the West Indies, England, and Holland. He had eight children, four sons and four daughters, of whom his oldest son, Joseph, his partner in business and supercargo of one of their ships, was lost at sea, and David, the youngest, was drowned in the millpond at home on his college vacation. Jonathan, the "War Governor," had just graduated from college and finished his preparation for the ministry, and was to have been settled in Colchester, when his brother was lost at sea, and he felt constrained to abandon the ministry and go to the assistance of his father. Here he acquired that business knowledge and ability which proved so valuable when he came to administer the affairs of the State and succor Washington and his army in their extremity. No wonder General Washington looked to him with hope when he could find help nowhere else, saying, "Let us see what Brother Jonathan can do for us"; and little wonder that he found it when the State responded with such contributions and sacrifices to the appeals of their heroic Governor."[2]





1. History of New London County, Connecticut, with Biographical Sketches of many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, Compiled by D. Hamilton Hurd, J. W. Lewis & Co., Philadelphia, 1882, page 491.
2. The Lebanon War Office. The History of the Building, and Report of the Celebration at Lebanon, Conn., Flag Day, June 15, 1891., Edited by Jonathan Trumbull, Published by the Connecticut Society of Sons of the American Revolution, Press of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, Hartford, Conn., 1891, page 75.






Thursday, November 17, 2016

Gravestone of Lt. Col. Jonathan Trumbull, Jr., Governor of Connecticut.




Gravestone of Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Trumbull, Jr.
Governor of Connecticut
Trumbull Cemetery, Lebanon, Connecticut 



My ancestral first cousin, Jonathan Trumbull, Jr., ". . . was born March twenty-sixth, 1740, and was baptized Jonathan, after his father. Like his elder brother, he too was destined to a remarkable career -- like him to enter with zeal into the cause of his country when the War for Independence began, but in different departments of duty -- soon to become in this war Paymaster-General for the Northern Department of the American Army -- then Private Secretary to the Commander-in-chief of all the American Armies -- next, surviving the war, to become a member of the first House of Representatives of the United States -- then Speaker of this House -- next a Senator of the United States -- and last, succeeding his father, after a few years, as Governor of his native State, to expire, at a good old age, with the mantle of gubernatorial power still wrapped around him."[1]




1. Life of Jonathan Trumbull, Sen., Governor of Connecticut, I.W. Stuart, Crocker and Brewster, Boston, 1859, pg. 41.



Monday, November 14, 2016

Gravestone of Elijah Johnson of Colchester, Connecticut.




Gravestone of Elijah Johnson
Old Cemetery, Colchester, Connecticut

My ancestral grandfather Elijah Johnson of Colchester, Connecticut, son of John Johnson and Mary Ramsey, married Sarah Trumble, daughter of Joseph Trumble, Jr. and Sarah Bulkeley. 

Children of Elijah Johnson and Sarah Trumble: 

1. Catherine Johnson, married Obed Alvord. 
2. Lucy Johnson, married Reuben Clark.
3. Joseph Johnson, married Jerusha Foote.
4. Gurdon Johnson.
5. Elijah Johnson.



Saturday, November 12, 2016

Joseph's Farewell - December 29, 1731.




Joseph's Farewell - December 29, 1731

Pencil Sketch of Joseph Trumble, Jr. (my ancestral grandfather), age 26, son of Captain Joseph Trumble, Sr., and his wife Hannah Higley. He set sail from the Port of New London aboard the Trumbull family merchant vessel, the brigantine "Lebanon", bound for the West Indies, December 29, 1731. It was reported five days later by a Captain Boulder, who witnessed the "Lebanon" in "great distress in a storm." Neither the ship or crew were ever seen or heard of again, and were considered "lost at sea".

" . . . on a foreign voyage in the interest of his father's growing business, he was lost at sea, leaving a widow with two daughters. Doubtless he had become, at this time, his father's right-hand man, and doubtless too, much of the father's success and prosperity were due to this son."[1]

Joseph Trumble, Jr., was commissioned Quartermaster of the Windham County Troop of Horse in October 1730. He was the eldest son and business partner of Captain Joseph Trumble, Sr., Patriarch of the Trumbull family of Lebanon, Connecticut. He was also the older brother of Connecticut's Revolutionary War Patriot Governor, Jonathan Trumbull, Sr. 

He left behind his wife, Sarah Bulkeley, the daughter of the Reverend John Bulkeley, First Minister at Colchester, Connecticut, and two young daughters, Sarah and Catherine Trumble.



1. Jonathan Trumbull, Governor of Connecticut, 1769-1784, Jonathan Trumbull, Boston, Little, Brown and Company, 1919, pg. 8. 



Friday, November 11, 2016

The House Site of the Reverend Peter Bulkeley of Concord, Massachusetts.



House Site of the Rev. Peter Bulkeley
Concord, Massachusetts




Bronze tablet marking the house site of the Reverend Peter Bulkeley of Concord, Massachusetts. The Reverend Peter Bulkeley was the Great Grandfather of Sarah (Bulkeley) Trumble Welles, the wife of Joseph Trumble, Jr., and the mother of Sarah (Trumble) Johnson Watrous and Catherine (Trumble) Burnham. 



Sunday, November 6, 2016

Trumbull Family Tomb, Lebanon, Connecticut.





Trumbull Family Tomb
Trumbull Cemetery, Lebanon, Connecticut

Burial site of Jonathan Trumbull, Sr., Connecticut's Revolutionary War Patriot Governor.


"Sacred to the memory of Jonathan Trumbull, Esq.
who, unaided by birth or powerful connections,
but blessed with a noble and virtuous mind,
arrived to the highest station in government.
His patriotism and firmness during 50 years of employment in public life,
and particularly in the very important part he acted in the American Revolution,
as Governor of Connecticut, the faithful page of History will record.
Full of years and honors, rich in benevolence,
and firm in the faith and hopes of Christianity,
he died Aug. 9th, 1785, Aetatis 75."[1]


Upon hearing of the Governor's death in 1785, George Washington wrote:

"A long and well spent life in the service of his country, justly entitled him to the first place among patriots."[2]







1. Ancient Grave Yard at Lebanon, Conn. [Partial listing of inscriptions]; Ashbel Woodward, New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 12, January 1858, Pages 55-63.
2. George Washington to Jonathan Trumbull, Jr., Mount Vernon, October 1, 1785, George Washington Papers, Series 2, Letterbooks 1754-1799, Library of Congress.





Saturday, November 5, 2016

The War Office, Lebanon, Connecticut.



The War Office
Lebanon, Connecticut
Owned and maintained by the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, Inc.

The War Office, according to tradition was built circa 1727 by Gov. Trumbull's father, Captain Joseph Trumble, Sr., the Patriarch of the Trumble/Trumbull family of Lebanon, Connecticut. The Trumbulls were merchants, and the War Office originally served as the Trumbull family store. The War Office is where Governor Jonathan Trumbull, Sr. met with the Connecticut Council of Safety during the American Revolution (1775-1783). In this building Washington, Putnam, Knox, Parsons, Huntington, Spencer, Lafayette, Rochambeau, Chastellux, Lauzun and others met with Connecticut's Patriot Governor. "It has been said that more money, food, munitions, and manpower for the colonial forces were directed from this building during the Revolution than from any other area in the 13 original colonies."[1]





1Exploring Connecticut, William J. Prendergast, The Pequot Press, Inc., Second Printing, 1970. 




Thursday, November 3, 2016

Joseph Trumbull Burnham of Hebron, Connecticut.





Gravestone of Joseph Trumbull Burnham
Andover Road Cemetery, Hebron, Connecticut 




Joseph Trumbull Burnham, son of Benjamin Burnham and Catherine Trumble (see The Lost Trumbull); born at Colchester, Connecticut, 3 February 1773;[1] died at Hebron, Connecticut, 1 March 1852;[2] married (1) Jerusha Kellogg; born at Hartford, Connecticut, 12 April 1777; married (2) Violetta Mann (widow Phelps), 4 July 1816; married (3) Sarah B. Isham, 26 February 1839.[3]

For the descendants of Joseph Trumbull Burnham, see: Family Records [Heretofore unpublished] Collected in Commemoration of the Three Hundredth Anniversary of the Settlement of Connecticut (New Haven, Conn.: The Connecticut Chapter of the National Society Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America, Inc., 1935), 53-55.


Endnotes:

1. Family Records [Heretofore unpublished] Collected in Commemoration of the Three Hundredth Anniversary of the Settlement of Connecticut (New Haven, Conn.: The Connecticut Chapter of the National Society Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America, Inc., 1935), 53.
2. Gravestone inscription, Joseph T. Burnham, Andover Road Cemetery, Hebron, Connecticut.  
3. Family Records [Heretofore unpublished] Collected in Commemoration of the Three Hundredth Anniversary of the Settlement of Connecticut (New Haven, Conn.: The Connecticut Chapter of the National Society Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America, Inc., 1935), 53.





Saturday, October 29, 2016

Charles Foote, Sr., of Colchester, Connecticut. Revolutionary War Veteran.




Gravestone of Charles Foote, Sr.
Old Cemetery, Colchester, Connecticut
Revolutionary War Veteran



My ancestral grandfather Charles Foote, Sr., a Revolutionary War veteran, served as a private in Captain Hezekiah Parsons’ (10th) Company, Colonel Benjamin Hinman’s Fourth Connecticut Regiment of 1775, Continental, taking part in the Siege of Boston, serving from 13 May 1775 to 3 December 1775.[1] He was born 10 November 1723;[2] the son of Nathaniel Foote and Ann Clark;[3] he died at Colchester, Connecticut, 25 August 1795;[4] he married October 1750, Jerusha Chamberlain,[5] daughter of John Chamberlain and Eunice Johnson.[6] 

Their daughter Jerusha Foote married Joseph Johnson of Colchester, Connecticut (see The Lost Trumbull).


Gravestone of Jerusha (Chamberlain) Foote, wife of Charles Foote, Sr.
Old Cemetery, Colchester, Connecticut

Charles Foote, Sr., was the great great grandson of Nathaniel Foote, "the Settler", and his wife Elizabeth Deming, and the great grandson of Nathaniel Foote and his wife Elizabeth Smith.



Monument to Nathaniel Foote, "The Settler"
Wethersfield Green, Wethersfield, Connecticut 

Charles Foote, Sr., was the grandson of Nathaniel Foote "The Quartermaster" and his wife Margaret Bliss. Charles was most likely born in the Nathaniel Foote House in Colchester, Connecticut. The house was started by his grandfather in 1699, and finished by his father in 1702. 




My first visit to the Nathaniel Foote House in Colchester, Connecticut. 




The Nathaniel Foote House
Colchester, Connecticut

The Town of Colchester Tricentennial Colonial Encampment on the Colchester Green, Colchester, Connecticut, June 5-7, 1998. The General Israel Putnam Branch #4 of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution held a Patriot grave marking ceremony for Charles Foote, Sr. and Joseph Johnson in the Old Cemetery on June 6, 1998. 










Endnotes:

1. Record of Service of Connecticut Men in the War of the Revolution, Adjutants General, Hartford, 1889, 62.
2. Abram W. Foote, Foote Family comprising the Genealogy and History of Nathaniel Foote of Wethersfield, Conn. and His Descendants, 2 vols (Rutland, VT.: Tuttle Company, 1907), 1:48.
3. Ibid., 33.
4. Ibid., 48.
5. Ibid., 48.
6. Chamberlain Association News, Series II, Volume 6, Number 1, 1986.


Friday, October 28, 2016

Jacob Cutler of Manchester, Connecticut. War of 1812 Veteran.




Gravestone of Jacob Cutler
East Cemetery, Manchester, Connecticut
War of 1812 Veteran


My ancestral grandfather Jacob Cutler served as a private in Captain Newhall Taintor’s company, First Regiment (Brainerd’s) Connecticut Militia during the War of 1812.  He was on duty in New London, Connecticut (Fort Trumbull) from 18 August 1814 to 27 October 1814.[1]

He married Demis Johnson, the daughter of Joseph Johnson, and the great grandaughter of "The Lost Trumbull," Joseph Trumble, Jr. of Lebanon, Connecticut.

For more on Jacob Cutler, see The Lost Trumbull, seventh generation.



1Record of Connecticut Men who served in the Regular Army and Militia in the War of 1812, 42; National Archives Veterans Records, War of 1812 Company Muster Rolls, file 343; William E. Buckley, A New England Pattern: the History of Manchester, Connecticut (Chester, Conn.: Pequot Press, 1973), 358.






Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Sarah (Bulkeley) Trumble Welles (1702-1798) of Colchester, Connecticut.




Bulkeley Family Tomb
(Tomb of my ancestral grandmother Sarah (Bulkeley) Trumble Welles)
Old Cemetery, Colchester, Connecticut 


SARAH BULKELEY, who was born at Colchester, Connecticut, 8 April 1702.[1] She died at Colchester in 1798 and was buried in the recently excavated and restored Bulkeley Family Tomb, Old Cemetery, Colchester.[2] She  married (1) at Lebanon on 20 November 1727, JOSEPH TRUMBLE JR.[3] who was born at Lebanon, Connecticut, 27 March 1705; apparently he was lost at sea about 28 December 1731, aboard the Brigantine Lebanon, bound for the West Indies.[4]

Sarah Bulkeley was the daughter of the Reverend John and Patience (Prentice) Bulkeley, granddaughter of the Reverend Gershom and Sarah (Chauncy) Bulkeley, and great-granddaughter of the Reverend Peter and his wife Grace (Chetwood) Bulkeley and the Reverend Charles and Catherine (Eyre) Chauncy.[5]  It was the Reverend Peter Bulkeley who gathered the twelfth church in the colony preaching "The Gospel Covenant" at Concord, Massachusetts.[6] The Reverend Charles Chauncy was the minister at Scituate and Plymouth, Massachusetts, and second president of Harvard College.[7]   

Sarah married (2) at Colchester 29 June 1738, JOHN WELLES of Colchester;[8] he was born 16 December 1693.[9] Issue from Sarah’s second marriage was Chauncey Welles, born at Colchester 1745; died at Colchester 26 January 1810.[10]



Children of Joseph Jr. and Sarah (Bulkeley) Trumble, all born in Lebanon, Connecticut:[11]

1) SARAH TRUMBLE, bpt. Lebanon First Congregational Church, 15 Sept. 1728. Married (1) Elijah Johnson of Colchester, Connecticut, and (2) Deliverance Watrous. 

2) KATHARINE TRUMBLE, bpt. Lebanon First Congregational Church, 23 May 1731. Married Benjamin Burnham. 



Endnotes

1Barbour Collection of Connecticut Vital Records, from Colchester Vital Records, 28; hereinafter cited as Barbour Collection. 
2. Peter Marteka, "Tomb Holds Colonial Families Remains," Hartford Courant (eastern edition), Oct. 11, 2002, p. B3.
3. Barbour Collection, Lebanon Vital Records, 28.
4. Ibid., Lebanon Vital Records, 168. 
5. Donald Lines Jacobus, The Bulkeley Genealogy; Rev. Peter Bulkeley… (New Haven, Conn.: Tuttle, 1933), 92, 111, 116, 139-140, 171; hereinafter cited as Bulkeley Genealogy.  Note: see Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists who came to New England between 1623 and 1650, 6th ed. (Baltimore, Md..: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1988), lines 7, 31, 69 for the royal ancestry of the Bulkeley, Chetwode, and Chauncey lines.
6. Jacobus, Bulkeley Genealogy, 93; Alan Heimert and Andrew Delbanco, eds., The Puritans in America: a Narrative Anthology (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1985), 117-121.
7. Frederick Lewis Weis, The Colonial Clergy and the Colonial Churches of New England (repr., Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1977, c. 1936), 53; Weis, Sixty Colonists, 74.
8. Jacobus, Bulkeley Genealogy, 171.
9. Barbour Collection, from Wethersfield Vital Records, 279. 
10. Jacobus, Bulkeley Genealogy, 171.
11. Barbour Collection, from Lebanon Vital Records, 1:301.








Monday, October 24, 2016

The House of Captain Joseph Trumble, Sr., of Lebanon, Connecticut, built circa 1735/40.




The Governor Jonathan Trumbull Sr. House
Lebanon, Connecticut 
Owned and maintained by the Connecticut Daughters of the American Revolution.



My ancestral grandfather, Captain Joseph Trumble, Sr., Patriarch of the Trumbull family of Lebanon, Connecticut had this house built in 1735/1740. In 1755 the house was inherited by his eldest surviving son, Jonathan Trumble/Trumbull, Sr., Connecticut's Revolutionary War Governor. "The house of Governor Trumbull stood originally and until 1824 on the north corner of Town Street and the Colchester road, on the present site of the Lyman house, and the War Office was west and near it, on the Colchester road."[1] 






1. History of New London County, Connecticut, with Biographical Sketches of many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men, Compiled under the supervision of D. Hamilton Hurd, Philadelphia, 1882, 489-90. 

Sunday, October 23, 2016

Joseph Johnson of Colchester, Connecticut. Revolutionary War Veteran.



Gravestone of Joseph Johnson
Old Cemetery, Colchester, Connecticut
Revolutionary War Veteran


My ancestral Grandfather Joseph Johnson was the son of Elijah Johnson of Colchester, Connecticut and his wife Sarah Trumble of Lebanon, Connecticut. Grandson of Joseph Trumble, Jr. (see The Lost Trumbull).

JOSEPH JOHNSON, born at Colchester 17 June 1750, was baptized at Colchester First Congregational Church, 29 July 1750;[1] he died at Colchester 17 November 1808, "Killed by a cart running over him"[2] and was buried at Old Cemetery, Colchester.[3] Joseph was married by the Rev. Ephraim Little at Colchester First Congregational Church, Colchester, 25 February 1779, to JERUSHA FOOTE;[4] she was born at Colchester 2 March 1755, daughter of Charles Foote Sr. and Jerusha Chamberlain of Colchester;[5] she died at Coventry, Chenango County, New York, 21 January 1831.[6]

Joseph Johnson was a veteran of the American Revolution. He served as a corporal in Captain Nathaniel Webb’s company, Colonel John Durkee’s Fourth Connecticut Regiment of the Continental Line. He served from 1 March 1777 to 1 March 1780.  He re-enlisted and was appointed corporal 1 May 1780 in Captain Andrew Fitch’s Company of the Fourth Connecticut Regiment for a term of seventeen months and was discharged 30 September 1781.[7]

Children of Joseph and Jerusha (Foote) Johnson, all born in Colchester, Connecticut:[8]

1) DEMIS, b. 17 June 1779.
2) ELISHA, b. 6 Dec. 1780.
3) GURDON, b. 3 Nov. 1782; d. 21 Oct. 1786.
4) CLARISSA, b. 11 Dec. 1784.
5) LOIS, b. 14 Sept. 1786.
6) GURDON, 20 Aug. 1788.
7) RALPH, 9 Feb. 1791.
8) THEODOCIA, 10 March 1793.
9) WILLIAM, 11 March 1795.
10) JERUSHA, 14 Oct. 1798.


Endnotes

1. William E. Johnson, John Johnson and Other Johnsons (McDonough, N.Y.: the Author, 1940), 54, 59; hereinafter cited as Johnson, John Johnson.
2. Johnson, John Johnson, 59; Nathaniel Goodwin, The Foote Family or Descendants of Nathaniel Foote (Hartford, Conn.: Case, Tiffany & Co., 1849), 88, hereinafter cited as Goodwin, The Foote Family.; Paul Franklin Johnson, ed., Genealogy of Captain John Johnson of Roxbury, Massachusetts: Generations I to XIV (Los Angeles, Calif.: Commonwealth Press, 1951), 43.
3. Charles R. Hale, "Charles R. Hale Collection [of Cemetery Inscriptions and Newspaper Notices of Marriages and Deaths]," (1933-34), hereinafter cited as Charles R. Hale Collection, at the Connecticut State Library, Old Cemetery, Colchester, Conn.
4. Frederic W. Bailey, ed., Early Connecticut Marriages as Found on Ancient Church Records prior to 1800, 7 vols. (New Haven: Bureau of American Ancestry, 1896-1906; repr. 7 vols. in 1, Baltimore, Md.: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1968), 3:107; hereinafter cited as Early Connecticut Marriages.; Abram W. Foote, Foote Family comprising the Genealogy and History of Nathaniel Foote of Wethersfield, Conn. and His Descendants, 2 vols (Rutland, VT.: Tuttle Company, 1907), 1:49; hereinafter cited as Foote, Foote Family. 
5. Foote, Foote Family, 48-49. Charles Foote Sr., a Revolutionary War veteran, served as a private in Captain Hezekiah Parsons’ [10th] Company, Colonel Benjamin Hinman’s Fourth Connecticut Regiment of 1775, Continental, taking part in the Siege of Boston, serving from 13 May 1775 to 3 December 1775. 
6. Foote, Foote Family, 49.
7. Compiled Service Records of Soldiers who Served in the American Army During the Revolutionary War 1775-1783 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives Record Administration, 1894-1912), MF M881:248; can be accessed at www.fold3.com; Daughters of the American Revolution, DAR Patriot Index, 3 vols. (Baltimore, Md.: Gateway Press, 2003), 2:371.
8. Goodwin, The Foote Family, 88; for the list of children's names, see Foote, Foote Family, 49.




Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Catherine (Trumble) Burnham.


Gravestone of Catherine/Kate (Trumble) Burnham (my ancestral aunt), daughter of Joseph Trumble, Jr. and Sarah (Bulkeley) Trumble Welles. Sister of Sarah (Trumble) Johnson Watrous. She married Benjamin Burnham who was lost at sea in 1772. 

They had one child, Joseph Trumbull Burnham. 




Andover Road Cemetery, Hebron, Connecticut. 






Tuesday, October 18, 2016

John Trumble of Newcastle-on-Tyne.



Gravestone of my ancestral grandparents John Trumble and his wife Ellinor Chandler of Newcastle-on-Tyne, Northumberland, England. Immigrant ancestors of the Trumble/Trumbull family of Lebanon, Connecticut. Old Cemetery, Rowley, Massachusetts. 

"John Trumble, immigrant ancestor of this family, was a cooper, and came to New England from Newcastle-on-Tyne, Northumberland, England.  He settled at Rowley, [Massachusetts,] in 1640, and filled the offices of town clerk and schoolmaster."[1]

"John Trumble, Cooper, of Roxbury in 1639, and among the first members of Mr. Eliot's Church there, and the following year (13 May 1640) made freeman of Rowley. He brought to this country a wife Ellen and son John." [2]


In Memory of
John Trumble,
one of the early settlers
of Rowley:
he was a Teacher 
and Town Clerk.
He died
July 17, 1657.
and his wife
Ellen,
who died 1648-9

Erected in 1881 by
Rev. Dr. David Trumbull [3]





1. William Richard Cutter, ed., Genealogical and Family History of the State of Connecticut, 4 vols. (New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911; repr. Baltimore, Md.: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), 1:403; Jonathan Trumbull, Jonathan Trumbull, Governor of Connecticut 1769-1784 (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1919), 4.
2. Contributions to a Trumbull Genealogy, from gleanings in English Fields, James Henry Lea, Boston: David Clapp & Son, 1895, 3.
3. Inscriptions from the Old Cemetery in Rowley, Mass., copied by Geo. B. Blodgette, M.A., Salem, Mass.: The Salem Press Publishing and Printing Co., 1893, 73. 



Monday, October 17, 2016

My First Visit to the War Office.




My first visit to the historic War Office in Lebanon, Connecticut. 


"The most historic place in Lebanon, once the store of Governor Trumbull's father [Captain Joseph Trumble, Sr.], is the old War Office building dating back to 1727, the floors of which have been trodden upon by Washington, Rochambeau, Admiral de Ternay, de Lauzun, Lafayette, Chastellux, the Dillon brothers, who were later guillotined, and Generals Sullivan, Knox, Putnam; by Samuel Adams, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin."[1]


1. France and New England Being a Further Account of the Connecting Links Between That Country and New England, Volume II, Allan Forbes and Paul F. Cadman, State Street Trust Company, Boston, MA, 1927, Page 103.

The War Office is owned and maintained by The Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, Inc. 


Sunday, October 16, 2016

Sarah Trumble, The Wife of Elijah Johnson of Colchester, Connecticut.



Sarah Trumble, 
The Wife of Elijah Johnson of ColchesterConnecticut.

by Todd Gerlander

Much of the following originally appeared in "The "Lost" Trumbull: The Descendants of Joseph
Trumble Jr. (1705-1731) of LebanonConnecticut, the Eldest Son and Business Partner of Captain
Joseph Trumble Sr. and Brother of Connecticut's Revolutionary War Governor, Jonathan Trumbull
Sr." by Lee Gerlander and Todd Gerlander, published in "The Connecticut Nutmegger",
Connecticut Society of Genealogists, Inc., Volume 46, Number 3, December 2013. The article was a
culmination of decades of research, beginning back in the early 1970's on the Trumbull-
Bulkeley-Johnson family connection. The following study focuses on pages 198 to 200 of that
publication, with additional evidence regarding Sarah (Trumble) Johnson (my ancestral
grandmother), the daughter of Joseph Trumble Jr. (1705-1731) of Lebanon, Connecticut, and
Sarah (Bulkeley) Trumble Welles (1702-1798), daughter of Rev. John Bulkeley of Colchester, 
Connecticut.

Without an actual marriage record of Elijah and Sarah Johnson, the case is made, and evidence is
presented that it was Sarah (Trumble) Johnson who was the wife of Elijah Johnson, and the mother of
his children.

This paper will also show that Sarah (Hopson) Clark, the wife of Asa Clark, was never married
to Elijah Johnson of Colchester, Connecticut, nor was she the mother of his children. She never
legally went by the name Sarah Johnson. Sarah Hopson was born 29 January 1737 according to the
Vital Records, not 29 January 1727 as stated in The Genealogy of Captain John Johnson of
RoxburyMassachusetts: Generations 1 to XIV (Los Angeles, Calif.: Commonwealth Press,
1951), by Paul Franklin Johnson, which appears to be the only reference (undocumented) for it?
The documentation and evidence points to Sarah Trumble, who legally went by the name Sarah
Johnson.

Further information on the fact that Asa Clark and his wife Sarah Hopson were part of the
migration of New England Planters to Nova Scotia (1760-1768), and that Sarah (Hopson)
Clark never married a Waters/Watrous proves she was never Sarah Johnson, the wife of Elijah
Johnson of Colchester, Connecticut.




SARAH TRUMBLE, baptized at Lebanon First Congregational Church, Lebanon, Connecticut,
05 September 1728, died about 1810;[1] she married (1) ELIJAH JOHNSON, about 1743/44,[2] who
was born at Colchester, Connecticut, 20 September 1718, son of John and Mary (Ramsey) Johnson [3]
he died at Colchester 28 August 1755.[4] Sarah married (2) DELIVERANCE WATERS or
"WATROUS", after 1760.[5]

Concerning the marriage of Elijah Johnson and Sarah Trumbull: The signature used by Sarah
(Trumble) Johnson in signing for her portion of her grandfather, Captain Joseph Trumble, Sr.'s estate
and the signature used by Sarah (Trumble) Johnson, signing for her portion of her late husband,
Elijah Johnson's estate, appear identical.

In The Genealogy of Captain John Johnson of RoxburyMassachusetts: Generations 1 to XIV
(Los Angeles, Calif.: Commonwealth Press, 1951), the author Paul Franklin Johnson incorrectly lists
Sarah Hopson as the wife of Elijah Johnson. This genealogy lists the birth date of this Sarah Hopson
as 29 January 1727.
  
However, both Gordon Hopson Tully's The Hopson Family of Colchester. Conn., 1700-1760/1770
([Upper Montclair, N.J.: Tully, 1974?]), a typescript at the Connecticut State Library, Hartford, and
the Barbour Collection, Colchester Vital Records, lists her birth date as 29 January 1737. The latter
source also lists her older sister Betty/Elizabeth's birth date as 16 February 1735 (p. 87). If the
marriage between Elijah Johnson and Sarah Hopson were correct, Sarah would have been nine years
old when her supposed first child Catherine was baptized on 14 September 1746 (Records of the First
Church of Colchester, Connecticut).[6] Johnson's genealogy provides no evidence or proof for this
marriage.

In fact, Sarah Hopson married Asa Clark on 4 December 1755 in ColchesterConnecticut.[7] In the
church marriage record she is listed as Sarah Hopson, not as Sarah Johnson, nor is the term "widow"
used as in other such entries. It is also questionable that Sarah Hopson, a woman in mourning, would
re-marry less than four months after the death of her first husband.[8]

In 1755, Sarah (Trumble) Johnson signed an administration bond with her Uncle (her mother's
brother) Oliver Bulkeley in her late husband, Elijah Johnson's estate.[9]

Sarah (Trumble) Johnson was named in her grandfather, Captain Joseph Trumble Sr.'s will: "To my
Grandaughters Sarah & Katherine Trumble the Daughters of my son Joseph I give twenty five pounds
apiece old tenor to be paid them out of my moveable estate by my Executor." Sarah Trumble
signed the discharge on 01 March 1756 as Sarah Johnson.[10]

28 November 1759, Sarah Johnson sells land in ColchesterConnecticut for the sum of nineteen
pounds lawful money to pay debts (land formerly owned by her late husband Elijah Johnson as
stated) to Epaphras Lord of ColchesterConnecticut. The deed is signed Sarah Johnson. If it was
Sarah Hopson she would have signed Sarah Clark, since Sarah Hopson married Asa Clark in
ColchesterConnecticut, 04 December 1755. Sarah Trumble was still Sarah Johnson in 1759, not
marrying Deliverance Waters until after 1760. There are numerous land transfers involving Sarah
Johnson in the Colchester Land Records to settle debts. Sarah Johnson acting as Administratrix
of the estate of her late husband Elijah Johnson. All are signed Sarah Johnson, none are signed Sarah
Clark.[11]

In 1759 Captain Peter Bulkeley of ColchesterConnecticut, became the legal guardian of the
children of his Niece Sarah (Trumble) Johnson and the late Elijah Johnson also of Colchester.
Their great-uncle, Captain Peter Bulkeley, was the brother of their grandmother, Sarah (Bulkeley)
Trumble Welles. Their uncle John Johnson of Colchester, Elijah Johnson's brother, witnessed and
signed the bond.[12]

15 May 1809, Sarah "Watrous," the late Sarah Johnson, sold her dower rights from the estate of
her late husband Elijah Johnson of Colchester.[13] In 1809, Sarah (Hopson) Clark was living
in CornwallisNova Scotia with her husband Asa Clark, who she married in 1755. Sarah (Hopson)
Clark was never Sarah "Watrous", and therefore never Sarah Johnson.

It is also interesting to note that Elijah and Sarah Johnson named their first born daughter,
Catherine, and their first born son, Joseph. Sarah Trumble's sister was named Catherine, and her
father, grandfather, and great grandfather were named Joseph. Both Sarah Trumble and her sister
Catherine Trumble named their first born son, Joseph.


Children of Elijah and Sarah (Trumble) Johnson, all born in ColchesterConnecticut:[14]

1) CATHERINE, born 01 August 1744; baptized 14 September 1746.
2) LUCY, baptized 13 March 1748.
3) JOSEPH, born 17 June 1750; baptized 29 July 1750; died 17 November 1808.
4) GURDON, born 3 November 1752; baptized 1752; died 21 October 1786.
5) ELIJAH, baptized 4 January 1756.

Child of Deliverance and Sarah (Trumble) (Johnson) Waters or Watrous.[15]

1) THEODORE WATERS or WATROUS m. (1) JEMIME ARCHER.[16]


Now regarding what we know about Sarah (Hopson) Clark,

SARAH HOPSON, born at Colchester, Connecticut, 29 January 1737;[17-20] died at Cornwallis,
Kings County, Nova Scotia, 1823;[21] she married at Colchester, Connecticut, 04 December 1755,
ASA CLARK,[22] born at Colchester, Connecticut, circa 1731;[23] died at Cornwallis, Kings County,
Nova Scotia, 19 May 1819.[24]

Children of Asa and Sarah (Hopson) Clark born in Connecticut and Nova Scotia:[25] [26]

1) Jehiel, born in Connecticut; buried in Wilmot Churchyard, 05 January 1797.
2) Sarah, born in Connecticut, 1758; died CornwallisNova Scotia, 1830.
3) Lucy, born 15 March 1760; married 26 May 1778, Asael Bentley, son of David and Ann Bentley.
4) Lydia, born 20 June 1762.
5) Asa, Jr., born 05 May 1765 at CobequidNova Scotia.
6) Charles, born 21 December 1767.
7) Jerusha, born 12 June 1770.
8) Jerusha, born 11 June 1771.
9) Lavinia, born 17 October 1773.
10) Hannah, born 25 February 1776.
11) John Hopson, born 28 July 1778.
12) Ephraim, born 12 April 1780; married 27 February 1811, Rachel Robertson.


Disregarding all of the undocumented online genealogies/webpages which list other
undocumented online genealogies/webpages as sources, and with no vital records, legal documents,
etc., what appears to be the only "source" published in a family genealogy which lists Sarah Hopson
as the wife of Elijah Johnson is "The Genealogy of Captain John Johnson of Roxbury,
Massachusetts 1630-1951", Paul Franklin Johnson, Los Angeles, CA, Commonwealth Press, 1951.

This "source" is problematic since the author provides NO documented source for this marriage,
he also changes the birth date of Sarah Hopson to 29 January 1727 (without any explanation
of why? One can only conclude it's because Sarah Hopson was born 29 January 1737 and she
would have been between seven and nine years old when this "marriage" supposedly took place?),
where the Colchester Vital Records and other early published sources list it as 29 January 1737.
Johnson's genealogy also lists her marrying (2) ________ Waters, when we know Sarah Hopson
married Asa Clark, the one provable fact which is not even mentioned in the Johnson genealogy?
(Sarah Johnson, the wife of Elijah Johnson had to marry a "Watrous" or Waters who sold her dower
 rights from the estate of her late husband Elijah Johnson of Colchester in 1809. This was not Sarah
 (Hopson) Clark.)

Sarah (Hopson) Clark was never legally Sarah Johnson, whereas Sarah (Trumble) Johnson was. 

It was Sarah Hopson's older sister, Elizabeth Hopson (born 16 February 1735) who married Elijah
Johnson's brother, Elisha Johnson in ColchesterConnecticut, 13 May 1753. Sarah and Elizabeth
Hopson's parents, Captain John Hopson (1707-1751) married Lydia Kellogg (1710-1761)
on 28 May 1730 in ColchesterCT. Sarah Hopson was born 29 January 1737, not 29 January 1727.

Also to note, "The History of Kings County, Nova Scotia, Heart of the Acadian Land", Arthur
Wentworth Hamilton Eaton, M.A., D.C.L., Salem Press Company, 1910, pg. 883, states that "Asa
Clark or Clarke was the founder of the King's County Clarke family" in Nova Scotia. Sarah Hopson
went to Canada with her husband Asa Clark with the migration of New England Planters to Nova 
Scotia (1760-1768). The book, "Nova Scotia Immigrants to 1867" by Leonard H. Smith Jr. and
Norma H. Smith lists both Asa Clark "s. of Noah/Sarah (Tainter)" and his wife Sarah "d. of
John/Lydia (Kellogg) Hobson" and that they went from "Conn. to Cornwallis (grantee) ca. 1760".
It is possible they were living in Nova Scotia as early as 1760, and that their third child Lucy was
born there? The birth of their daughter Lucy, 15 March 1760, is the first of their children listed in
the Cornwallis township book, which would suggest they were living there? But, it was probably
1761, since the Colchester Land Records list Asa Clark and his wife Sarah selling land to John
Kellogg. They were living in Cobequid or PortapiqueNova Scotia in 31 December 1764 when Asa
Clark received a grant of land in CornwallisNova Scotia. They were still in CobequidNova Scotia 
when their son Asa, Jr. was born 05 May 1765.[27] Sarah (Hopson) Clark died in 1823, and is
buried with her husband in the Upper Canard CemeteryKings CountyNova Scotia. Since her
husband Asa Clark died 19 May 1819 on the "Clark Homestead" in Cornwallis, Nova Scotia,[28] 
Sarah (Hopson) Clark was NOT the Sarah Watrous/Waters who sold her dower rights from the
estate of her late husband Elijah Johnson in Colchester, Connecticut in 1809. Sarah (Hopson)
Clark was married to Asa Clark from 1755 to his death in 1819. She never married a Watrous/Waters,
so it was not possible for her to be the wife of Elijah Johnson.

From the vital records (birth date) and evidence listed above, including her move to Canada, it is
not possible that Sarah (Hopson) Clark was the wife of Elijah Johnson. The evidence points
to and supports Sarah (Trumble) Johnson as the wife of Elijah Johnson.



Endnotes

1. Connecticut Church Records, IndexLebanon First Congregational Church 1700-1883
(Hartford: Connecticut State Library, 1942) 206; her death date is based on her selling her dower rights
in 1809.
2. William E. Johnson, John Johnson and Other Johnsons (McDonough, N.Y.: the author, 1940),
54; hereinafter cited as Johnson, John Johnson.
3. Barbour Collection, from Colchester Vital Records, 93; Johnson, John Johnson, 42-43.
4. Johnson, John Johnson, 54.
5. Marriage date based on the name she signed on legal documents.
6. Johnson, John Johnson, 57.
7. Barbour Collection, from Colchester Vital Records, 87; Frederic W. Bailey, ed., Early Connecticut
Marriages as Found on Ancient Church Records prior to 1800, 7 vols. (New Haven: Bureau of
American Ancestry, 1896-1906; repr. 7 vols. in 1, Baltimore, Md.: Genealogical Publishing Co.,
1968), 3:102; hereinafter cited as Early Connecticut Marriages.
8. Family Records [Heretofore unpublished] Collected in Commemoration of the Three
Hundredth Anniversary of the Settlement of Connecticut (New Haven, Conn.: The Connecticut
Chapter of the National Society Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America, Inc., 1935), 53;
hereinafter cited as Family Records.
9. Town of Colchester Records, 1742-1883, RG 62-028, Series 1, Court and Justice of the Peace
Records, 1742-1882, file 1804, Estate of Elijah Johnson (1755).
10. Windham Probate District, Estate of Joseph Trumble Sr., Lebanon 1755, File #3830.
11. ColchesterConnecticut Land Records
12. Town of Colchester Records, 1742-1883, RG 62-028, Series 1, Court and Justice of the Peace
Records, 1742-1882, file 1798, Estate of Catherine, Elijah, Gurdon, Joseph, Lucy Johnson (1759).
13. Colchester Land Records, 16:371.
14. Johnson, John Johnson, 54-55.
15.  Pedigree Resource File, database online at FamilySearch.org, citing "George E. Watrous;
Danielson, CT (1996); Personal records and family history notes (1996); copy in poss. of Steven B.
Watrous."
16. Ibid.
17. The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, New England Historic Genealogical
Society, Volume XLII, 1888, "Memoranda of all the Inscriptions in the Old Burying Ground at
Colchester, Conn." by Frank E. Randall, Esq., pg. 387.
18. The Kellogg's in the Old World and the New, Volume 1, Timothy Hopkins, 1903.
19. The History of Kings County, Nova Scotia, Heart of the Acadian Land, Arthur Wentworth
Hamilton Eaton, M.A., D.C.L., Salem Press Company, 1910, pg. 883; hereinafter cited as Kings
County.
20. The Hopson Family of ColchesterConn. 1700-1760/1770, Gordon Hopson Tully, 1974.
21. Kings County, 604-606.
22. Early Connecticut Marriages, 3:102.
23. Kings County, 883.
24. Kings County, 605.
25. Kings County, 605-606.
26. Cornwallis Township Book, Cornwallis, Kings CountyNova Scotia.
27. Kings County, 605.
28. Ibid.