Wednesday, February 27, 2019

The Gov. Jonathan Trumbull Chaise




The Governor Jonathan Trumbull Chaise



Illustration of the Governor Jonathan Trumbull Chaise.[1]



Engraving of Gov. Jonathan Trumbull (1710-1785).[2]




Illustration of the Governor Jonathan Trumbull Chaise.[3]



Unfortunately, the Gov. Jonathan Trumbull chaise no longer exists, it was destroyed by fire in 1911.

"Hartford, Conn. The famous old chaise in which Governor Jonathan Trumbull rode to his inauguration 200 years ago and which General Lafayette rode in when he visited Hartford after the revolutionary war, has been destroyed by fire in the stable of William Luby of Kensington."[4]



Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette.
Engraving of a portrait by Alonzo Chappel.[5]



I originally planned to write a blog post to find the present whereabouts of Gov. Jonathan Trumbull's chaise. I've seen old photos and references to Gov. Jonathan Trumbull's chaise for years now, and I thought it would be an interesting subject for The Lost Trumbull blog. A mystery, like the blog post on the missing War Office store counters. Gov. Jonathan Trumbull was known to have driven a chaise, and he would drive between Lebanon and Hartford, and other parts of the State during the American Revolution, etc. I contacted some of the historical societies of the towns where the chaise was known to have been, to see if anyone knew the location of Gov. Jonathan Trumbull's chaise today? I thought it could possibly be in a museum, or maybe rotting away in a barn somewhere, forgotten? I thought it could be like that carriage used in the "Wizard of Oz" movie that was originally President Abraham Lincoln's inauguration carriage? Maybe something that could be brought back to Lebanon, Connecticut, the home of Governor Jonathan Trumbull.

The Gov. Jonathan Trumbull chaise appeared at both the 1885 Centennial of Bristol, Connecticut,[6] and the 1906 Centennial of Burlington, Connecticut.[7] Mr. Warren G. Bunnell of Burlington rode in the chaise on both occasions.

"A strange object appeared in the midst of this brilliant throng, which more than the boom of guns told what all this meant, and gave to the children a revelation of their fathers. It was the two-wheeled chaise owned by Jonathan Trumbull, governor of Connecticut in 1776, and a horse forty years old last May, owned by Adna Barnes and wearing a harness of the same age, sustained the equilibrium of this masterpiece, in which rode Ralph Humphrey and Warren G. Bunnell of Burlington. The occupants of the chaise wore tall hats 100 years old, of the old white bell-crowned style. The old leathern boot was fastened up, betraying in common with the top and straw-stuffed arms, the undisputed signs of age. The wheels, though clumsy and large, had been cut down to the size of the rim, and new rims, much lighter, put in place of the first."[8]


The Bristol Press, Bristol, Connecticut, published a post card with a photo of the Gov. Jonathan Trumbull chaise, circa 1906, taken at the Centennial of Burlington, Connecticut.






Notes:

1. Brother Jonathan and his Home, William Elliot Griffis, The New England Magazine, New Series, Volume XVII, Number 1, September 1897, Warren F. Kellogg, Publisher, Boston, Mass., page 13. Digitized by Google, Google books, <https://books.google.com>.
2. Brother Jonathan, Hezekiah Butterworth, D. Appleton and Company, New York, 1903. Digitized by Google, Google books, <https://books.google.com>.
3. The Bristol Historical and Scientific Society, Piera Root Newell, The Connecticut Quarterly, Volume IV, January to December, 1898, Hartford, Conn., page 7. Digitized by Google, Google books, <https://books.google.com>; a similar illustration also appears in: Home Life in Colonial Days, Alice Morse Earle, (Reprint of the 1898 edition published by Grosset & Dunlap, New York.), The Berkshire Traveller Press, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1974, pages 352-353. 
4. Sausalito News, Volume 28, Number 1, December 30, 1911, page 1, California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside, <http://cdnc.ucr.edu>. 
5. The American Revolution, A Picture Sourcebook, John Grafton, Dover Publications, Inc., New York, 1975, page 119.
6. Centennial Celebration of the Incorporation of the Town of Bristol, June 17, 1885, compiled by John J. Jennings, Press of The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, Hartford, Conn., 1885, pages 21-22. Digitized by Google, Google books, <https://books.google.com>.
7. Some Burlington, Connecticut, Articles of the Past Gathered Together, Volume 1, Leonard Alderman, September, 1991, pages 19-20; Burlington, Images of America, Jean M. Martin, Arcadia Publishing, 2001, pages 22-23.
8. Centennial Celebration of the Incorporation of the Town of Bristol, June 17, 1885, compiled by John J. Jennings, Press of The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, Hartford, Conn., 1885, pages 21-22. Digitized by Google, Google books, <https://books.google.com>.








Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Gov. Jonathan Trumbull (1710-1785) Bronze Statue Dedication, Trumbull, Connecticut, November 17, 2002.





Engraving of Gov. Jonathan Trumbull (1710-1785).[1]



Gov. Jonathan Trumbull
Bronze Statue Dedication Ceremony

November 17, 2002

Town Hall Green
Trumbull, Connecticut



The Connecticut Line, Living History/Color Guard Unit of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution served as the Color Guard at the Gov. Jonathan Trumbull Bronze Statue Dedication Ceremony in Trumbull, Connecticut.



Gov. Jonathan Trumbull Bronze Statue Dedication Ceremony Program.




Gov. Jonathan Trumbull Bronze Statue 
Town Hall Green, Trumbull, Connecticut.





Notes:

1. History of New London County, Connecticut, with Biographical Sketches of many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men., Compiled under the supervision of D. Hamilton Hurd, Press of J. B. Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia, 1882. Digitized by Google, Google books, <https://books.google.com>.






Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Fort Trumbull, Fort Griswold, and the Battle of Groton Heights (September 6, 1781).



Fort Trumbull, 
Fort Griswold, and the Battle of Groton Heights 
(September 6, 1781)



Gov. Jonathan Trumbull (1710-1785).[1]



Fort Trumbull was named after Connecticut's Revolutionary War Governor Jonathan Trumbull, Sr. (1769-1784). Jonathan Trumbull, as Governor, was also Captain-General and Commander-in-Chief of the Connecticut Militia. 

"In pursuance of his plan, Clinton placed under command of the traitor Arnold an expedition destined for New London, whose spacious harbor was defended by a small battery on the New London side known as Fort Trumbull, and a much more formidable fort on the Groton side known as Fort Griswold."[2] 

During the American Revolution, Fort Trumbull was small, nothing like the stone fort that can be seen at the site today. The present Fort Trumbull is of a later period, post Revolution, classified as a "19th century third system coastal defense fortification."[3] "The garrison of the New London battery, consisting of twenty-three men, after firing a broadside at Arnold's forces, spiked their guns, and retreated in boats across the harbor to reinforce the small garrison of Fort Griswold."[4]

"Cornwallis at Yorktown, closely besieged in front by Lafayette, in the rear by Count de Grasse, with Washington but a few days' march distant, was already in the Continental grasp, his commander, Sir Henry Clinton, being left in New York by Washington's superior generalship, too far distant to render material assistance. In his dilemma Clinton determined on a feint, in the hope of recalling Washington from the south, and chose New London as the scene of his ruse de guerre. This town had sent out the most active and daring privateers that ever snatched a convoy from under the guns of a British frigate. Several rich prizes were then lying at its wharves, and its storehouses were filled with West India goods, provisions and military stores. Further, it would be a convenient base for certain predatory excursions into New England, which it is probable Clinton had long meditated, but, most important of all, it was within a day's march of Lebanon, the quiet country town where dwelt Governor Jonathan Trumbull -- Washington's "Brother Jonathan" -- and which contained the little store and counting-house, which had long been recognized as the real "war office" of the Continental Government, and the chief source of supplies for its army; and no doubt the hope of disturbing "Mr. Trumbull" in his operations, and of ravaging the rich agricultural region near him, from which he drew his supplies, was one of the motives of the expedition."[5]








Fort Trumbull State Park, New London, Connecticut 



I was the model for the Revolutionary War soldier figure inside Fort Trumbull



Events at Fort Trumbull





2002 Fort Trumbull Ceremony Program
Fort Trumbull State Park, New London, Connecticut


On June 14, 2002 the Connecticut Line, Living History/Color Guard Unit of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution participated in the Ceremony to Celebrate the Transfer of Fort Trumbull State Park and the Opening of the Visitor Center. The Connecticut Line CTSSAR had the honor of firing the musket salute during the Opening Ceremonies. A story and photos appeared in the New London Day on June 15, 2002.

The Connecticut Line, Living History/Color Guard Unit of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution is very active in events and ceremonies commemorating Fort Griswold and the Battle of Groton Heights. This started back in 1997 when we were invited to participate in the annual Heritage Weekend/Battle of Groton Heights Encampment/Reenactment at Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park by the Second Connecticut Regiment of the Continental Line and the Friends of Fort Griswold. I am happy to report that the Connecticut Line CTSSAR continues in the tradition of participating in annual events at Fort Griswold 20+ years and counting.



Friends of Fort Griswold 
Battle of Groton Heights commemoration programs
Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park, Groton, Connecticut



Through the efforts of members of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, in 2013 the Battle of Groton Heights (September 6, 1781) was recognized as an Official Historic Celebration by the National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. In addition to ceremonies at Fort Griswold, wreath laying ceremonies were also held at the Blockhouse (the fort's oldest structure) at Fort Trumbull State Park in 2013 and 2014.   





NSSAR - Battle of Groton Heights (September 6, 1781) Streamer







Members of the Connecticut Line, Living History/Color Guard Unit of the Connecticut Society
of the Sons of the American Revolution muster at Fort Trumbull.










Members of the Connecticut Line, Living History/Color Guard Unit of the Connecticut Society 
of the Sons of the American Revolution fire a musket salute to the heroes of the Battle of Groton Heights (September 6, 1781) during commemoration ceremonies at Fort Trumbull State Park.










~  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  ~



Fort Griswold, photo taken from the monument, circa 1970s


Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park, Groton, Connecticut


Photos of Ceremonies, Encampments, Reenactments, School Programs, etc.




1997 Encampment/Reenactment of the Battle of Groton Heights.









Remembering Colonel William Ledyard
Members of the Connecticut Line (11th Conn. Regt. Detachment), Living History/Color Guard 
Unit of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution and the Second 
Connecticut Regiment of the Continental Line.





Revolutionary War Encampments
Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park, Groton, Connecticut 






Members of the Connecticut Line (11th Conn. Regt. Detachment), Living History/Color Guard 
Unit of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution at the 1998 Encampment/Reenactment of the Battle of Groton Heights.











Reenactments of the Battle of Groton Heights (September 6, 1781)
Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park, Groton, Connecticut 







Annual Friends of Fort Griswold
 Battle of Groton Heights Commemoration Ceremonies








School programs at Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park


































225th Anniversary of the Battle of Groton Heights and the Burning of New London
 (September 6, 1781)

Revolutionary War Encampment/Reenactment




















Campsite of the Connecticut Line
Living History/Color Guard Unit of the Connecticut Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution














The Connecticut Line
Living History/Color Guard Unit of the Connecticut Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution fire a musket salute at the annual Friends of Fort Griswold
Battle of Groton Heights Commemoration Ceremonies




The Connecticut Line
Living History/Color Guard Unit of the Connecticut Society of the 
Sons of the American Revolution












































































































The Connecticut Line, Living History/Color Guard Unit 
of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution




















Ceremonies for Colonel William Ledyard
Groton, Connecticut














The Connecticut Line, Living History/Color Guard Unit of the Connecticut Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution place a wreath during the annual ceremonies for the 235th Anniversary of the Battle of Groton Heights (September 6, 1781), Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park, 
Groton, Connecticut.




























Notes:


1. Early Lebanon. An Historical Address Delivered in Lebanon, Conn., by Request on the National Centennial, July 4, 1876, Rev. Orlo D. Hine, Press of The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Company, Hartford, Conn., 1880. Digitized by the Internet Archive, <https://archive.org>.
2. Jonathan Trumbull, Governor of Connecticut, 1769-1784, by his Great-Great Grandson Jonathan Trumbull, Little, Brown, and Company, Boston, 1919, Page 280. Digitized by Google, Google books, <https://books.google.com>.
3. Fort Trumbull A Connecticut State Park, Park Brochure, State of Connecticut, Department of Environmental Protection, Fort Trumbull State Park, New London, Connecticut.
4. Jonathan Trumbull, Governor of Connecticut, 1769-1784, by his Great-Great Grandson Jonathan Trumbull, Little, Brown, and Company, Boston, 1919, Page 280. Digitized by Google, Google books, <https://books.google.com>.
5. The Massacre at Fort Griswold, September 6th, 1781, The Magazine of American History with Notes and Queries, Volume VII, A.S. Barnes & Company, September 1881, No. 3, Pages 161-162. Digitized by the Internet Archive, <https://archive.org>.